Design Guides for Heatstaking & Ultrasonic Welding

Ultrasonic Welding Joint Designs:
Download the PDF by clicking here: Ultrasonic-Welding-Joint-Designs.pdf

 


Heat Staking Design Guidelines:
Hollow Stake:

  • Works well with Large diameter studs (no smaller than .080" O.D.)
  • Produces a large strong head
  • Does not have to melt a large amount of material (less time, less force)
  • Avoids sink marks on the opposite side of molded component
  • Enables parts to be re-assembled with self-tapping screws should repair or dis-assembly be necessary
  • Aesthetically pleasing (can be made to look like it was "molded" on)

hollow1.gif

Rosette/Flared High Profile:

  • Recommended for large diameter posts
  • Flares out material giving 360 degrees of even holding strength
  • Stakes / moves more volume easily
  • Slightly less staking forces required
  • Slightly less cycle time as opposed to a dome stake on large studs
  • Alignment to our staking heads is critical (use our X-Y adjustments)
  • Requires very accurate positioning so that center point of tip contacts center of stud
  • Not generally recommended for use on heated platens (best on probes) because of thermal expansion
  • Not generally recommended on small diameter studs
  • Aesthetically pleasing (looks like a rivet)

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Knurled Stake:

  • Alignment is not an important consideration from an application standpoint
  • Ideally suited for high volume production
  • Three styles available: fine knurl, medium knurl, coarse knurl
  • Generally the pitch/texture of the knurl is related to diameter of stud to be staked
  • Can knurl a large tool and hit many stakes without alignment worries
  • Good use on heated platens where thermal expansion is generally a problem
  • Also works well when mating component has a countersink
  • Greatly reduces cycle time

knurl1.jpg

Rosette Low Profile:

  • Recommended for large diameter posts
  • Flares out material giving 360 degrees of even holding strength
  • Stakes / moves more volume easily
  • Less staking forces required
  • Slightly less cycle time as opposed to a dome stake on large studs
  • Alignment is critical
  • Requires very accurate positioning so that center point of tip contacts center of stud
  • Not generally recommended for use on heated platens (best on probes) because of thermal expansion
  • Not generally recommended on small diameter studs
  • Aesthetically pleasing

rlinfo.gif

Flush Stake:

  • Used for applications requiring a flush surface
  • Requires that mating component has sufficient thickness for a countersink, counterbore, or a combination of the two
  • Volume of the boss is crucial to fill the countersink properly

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Dome/Conical High Profile:

  • Generally used with bosses with an O.D. of 250" or less
  • Aesthetically pleasing
  • Produces a tight stake
  • Recommended for crystalline material with sharp melting points such as 33% G.F. nylon, highly defined melting temperatures, (post cooling a must)
  • Good for glass filled materials, or materials with abrasive fillers
  • Good for materials that degrade easily (post cooling)
  • Dome stakes come in two profiles: High and Low
  • High Profile stake is typically .750" high 3/4" or more
  • Low Profile stake type -.375=3/8" or less
  • Works well into counterbored holes

dhinfo.gif

Dome/Conical Low Profile:

  • Generally used with bosses with an O.D. of 250" or less
  • Aesthetically pleasing
  • Produces a tight stake
  • Recommended for crystalline materials with sharp melting points such as 33% G.F. nylon, highly defined melting temperatures, (post cooling a must)
  • Good for glass filled materials, or materials with abrasive fillers
  • Good for materials that degrade easily (post cooling)
  • Dome stakes come in two profiles: High and Low
  • High Profile stake is typically .750" high 3/4" or more
  • Low Profile stake type -.375=3/8" or less
  • Works well into counterbored holes

dlinfo.gif

 

 

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